95 Au fil du Doubs
95 Au fil du Doubs

Hiking

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Au fil du Doubs

Stage 1, Les Brenets–Maison Monsieur

Route report
101 photos

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Au fil du Doubs

Picturesque and rugged ravines that could almost be called fiords open up after Les Brenets. Polished by natural forces, the rock faces have the shape of a human face and the head of a legendary monster. The trail leads to the Saut du Doubs, a spectacular, 27m high waterfall.
In Les Brenets, first referred to as Chez le Bruinet in 1325, the industrialisation began in the 18th century. Precision mechanics, particularly watchmaking, experienced a veritable boom here and in Le Locle and it is still an important industrial branch to this day. The tour starts at the train station of Les Brenets. A paved road leads in the direction of the Restaurant Saut-du-Doubs. Along the way, you can see Lac des Brenets below, which was formed by the Doubs River. Through wild, fjord-like ravines with naturally polished rocks you continue to the Saut du Doubs, a 27 metre waterfall. In the winter, when the Doubs is frozen, this is one of Europe’s largest natural ice rinks.

The torrential river forming the border between France and Switzerland soon turns into Lac de Moron, which is smooth as glass. Follow the path above the lake to the wall of the dam. Once past it, the previously open and expansive landscape changes to a lovely environment, but it drops off steeply. This change in the scenery and the moss-covered trees are typical for the Doubs Nature Park. And so are the mills, which used to be located at various places along the Doubs, at Côte des Moulins Calame, for example. The licenses to operate the mills are dated as far back as 1573. The building was restored after it was destroyed by a fire in 1734. Four mills were in operation at that time, including a sawmill and a forge. The mills are named after Abraham-Louis Calame. His son gave them up in 1832 and the Canton Neuchâtel acquired them in 1842, but from 1880 on, they were left to deteriorate.

After about three hours or so, you reach the Torret electric power station. Years ago you could even find glassworks along the Doubs. They were built there because the wood from the area was utilised, but because of the steepness of the terrain, it could not be transported to the villages. For example, the glassworks of Blancheroche used approximately 100 cubic metres of wood per month. Because the glassmakers continued to relocate as soon as the fuel was used up in a particular area, the Neuchâtel authorities soon prohibited the operation of glassworks on their land. And soon, after walking more than five hours, the fascinating hike ends at Maison Monsieur.
Picturesque and rugged ravines that could almost be called fiords open up after Les Brenets. Polished by natural forces, the rock faces have the shape of a human face and the head of a legendary monster. The trail leads to the Saut du Doubs, a spectacular, 27m high waterfall.
In Les Brenets, first referred to as Chez le Bruinet in 1325, the industrialisation began in the 18th century. Precision mechanics, particularly watchmaking, experienced a veritable boom here and in Le Locle and it is still an important industrial branch to this day. The tour starts at the train station of Les Brenets. A paved road leads in the direction of the Restaurant Saut-du-Doubs. Along the way, you can see Lac des Brenets below, which was formed by the Doubs River. Through wild, fjord-like ravines with naturally polished rocks you continue to the Saut du Doubs, a 27 metre waterfall. In the winter, when the Doubs is frozen, this is one of Europe’s largest natural ice rinks.

The torrential river forming the border between France and Switzerland soon turns into Lac de Moron, which is smooth as glass. Follow the path above the lake to the wall of the dam. Once past it, the previously open and expansive landscape changes to a lovely environment, but it drops off steeply. This change in the scenery and the moss-covered trees are typical for the Doubs Nature Park. And so are the mills, which used to be located at various places along the Doubs, at Côte des Moulins Calame, for example. The licenses to operate the mills are dated as far back as 1573. The building was restored after it was destroyed by a fire in 1734. Four mills were in operation at that time, including a sawmill and a forge. The mills are named after Abraham-Louis Calame. His son gave them up in 1832 and the Canton Neuchâtel acquired them in 1842, but from 1880 on, they were left to deteriorate.

After about three hours or so, you reach the Torret electric power station. Years ago you could even find glassworks along the Doubs. They were built there because the wood from the area was utilised, but because of the steepness of the terrain, it could not be transported to the villages. For example, the glassworks of Blancheroche used approximately 100 cubic metres of wood per month. Because the glassmakers continued to relocate as soon as the fuel was used up in a particular area, the Neuchâtel authorities soon prohibited the operation of glassworks on their land. And soon, after walking more than five hours, the fascinating hike ends at Maison Monsieur.
19 km
540 m | 800 m
5 h 15 min
easy (hiking trail) | medium

Arrival | return travel

Arrival / return travel Les Brenets
SBB Timetable Show stop and route on map

Hints

Hint
Regular boat services operate between Les Brenets and the Saut du Doubs.

Arrival | return travel

Arrival / return travel La Maison-Monsieur, bif.
SBB Timetable Show stop and route on map

Contact

Signpost management
Signposting is managed by the cantonal hiking trail organisation on behalf of the canton.
Neuchâtel Rando
Espacité 1
2302 La Chaux-de-Fonds
info@neuchatelrando.ch
www.neuchatelrando.ch

Services

Accommodation

B&B La Salomé
B&B La Salomé
Les Planchettes
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Bookable offers

95 Au Fil Du Doubs
95 Au Fil Du Doubs
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Places

Les Brenets
Les Brenets
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Places of interest

Doubs Nature Park
Doubs Nature Park
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Signalization

Signalization
For hiking, follow the logo indicated on the yellow signposts. Take a printout of our web map on your hike for safety's sake.
Signalization